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Cocktail-Inspired Foods Star at SF Chefs

Cocktail-Inspired Foods Star at SF Chefs



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Now you don't have to choose between cocktails and an appetizer

Do you want to have your cocktail and eat it too? Good news, you’re in luck. What was once an impossible dream can now be your reality if you head to one of the cutting edge restaurants that are turning America’s favorite cocktails into food. While poptails (cocktail popsicles) have recently become popular, these new cocktail eats aren’t dessert, but rather part of your proper meal.

During the final day of SF Chefs, a food and wine festival in San Francisco that highlighted chefs and winemakers of Northern California, Chef John Madriaga of San Francisco's Spruce Restaurant presented his Bloody Mary-inspired raw tomato wedges appetizer. With lemon juice, salt, pepper, celery, onion and vodka they deliver cocktail flavor in a more substantial packaged. These are only the beginning of a long line of possible cocktail flavored foods. If you want to get creative, you could try making Bloody Mary fries, martini devilled eggs or even gin and tonic French toast. These plates are designed to simply have an alcohol-infused flavor. Since they are marinated or infused, the liquor soaks in giving you the impact of a drink in a satisfying meal packaged.

Madriaga warned the Huffington Post of his creations, “One slice won't get anyone drunk, but eventually — if you eat enough — they could. I tell people not to have more than three or four.” If you are looking for something to give you the flavor without the hangover, try the latest UK craze: cuptails. These cocktail-inspired cupcakes take classic sweet drinks, such as a pina colada or strawberry daiquiri, and turn them into a cute, bite sized piece of cake. But beware — these can still pack an alcohol punch if the frosting is made with liquor.

Don’t want to bother making cocktails for your next party? Serve these alcohol-infused, cocktail-inspired foods and everyone will be pleased. Having your cocktails — and eating them too — never tasted so good.


Chef Brandon Jew Shows How to Make Steak Fried Rice at Home

Brandon Jew

Brandon Jew's Most Recent Stories

In 2016, chef Brandon Jew opened Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco’s Chinatown, occupying the space that had housed the restaurant Four Seas for nearly 50 years. It’s not like he was looking for a restaurant as ample as the 10,000 square feet he was taking over, but he wanted to preserve this building that he felt was an important piece of Chinatown history and culture. He searched for investors and used his upbringing as a chef, immersion in San Francisco’s Chinatown and travels in China to inform what he wanted with his restaurant.

Related Stories

“Where I arrived with Mister Jiu’s is exactly where I’ve always been: in between. A little of this and a little of that. American and Chinese. Modern and traditional,” Jew writes in his debut cookbook Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown. “It’s a place that celebrates all my influences, standing in the heart of Chinatown, the place where Chinese American food began.”

He’s thought deeply about the canon of Chinese American recipes that grew up in San Francisco and has applied his technique and California’s bounty of produce to create his restaurant that now boasts a Michelin star. And from his new cookbook, he shares his expertise to take a classic fried rice to the next level.

The whole point of fried rice is to showcase the ethereal charred, smoky flavor, aroma, and texture known as wok hei. A wok makes this a lot easier to achieve, but I&rsquove made it happen with a thin cast-iron pan too. Here are the secrets.

  • Use hydrated but not moist rice. This is why leftover rice fries up airy, while fresh rice turns to mush. If necessary, cook up some rice and leave uncovered in the refrigerator 1 day before frying. It should be cold when you start.
  • Get your pan scorching hot. Whatever you&rsquore imagining is probably not hot enough. I set off the fire alarm whenever I cook fried rice at home (and once at a private dinner in a very tall office tower, where Anna Lee and all the office assistants threw open windows and fanned for their lives to prevent everyone in the building from having to evacuate). So turn up the flame and open your windows. Wait for that initial wok hei to hit your nose before adding the oil, then swirl the oil all around and up the sides of the pan. As you cook, unless you have a wok-burner on your gas range or a Chinese hearth stove well-stocked with firewood, you will have to turn up the heat each time you add something new and lower it again before the smoke gets out of control.
  • You have to keep things moving. A wide metal spatula is good for this, and so is a 14-inch or larger wok or pan. If you don&rsquot have a big enough wok for everything to dance around in, cook in batches and combine at the end. If I&rsquom using a cast-iron pan, I have a hand on it at all times so I can keep tossing everything up and around, since a spatula can&rsquot get in the corners fast enough. Line up your ingredients before you turn on the flame.

Cooking fried rice is all about immediacy, but you can begin with a mise of all kinds of leftovers. My mom, for instance, always packed doggy bags of the scraps of roast beef and rib-eye from Saturday nights at Sizzler to make the best fried-rice lunch the next day. This version uses tender marbled cuts of wagyu, chopped broccolini, egg, and a dusting of salty sīn beef heart that takes a few days to cure and may require a special order from the butcher.

Photo: courtesy Ten Speed Press


Chef Brandon Jew Shows How to Make Steak Fried Rice at Home

Brandon Jew

Brandon Jew's Most Recent Stories

In 2016, chef Brandon Jew opened Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco’s Chinatown, occupying the space that had housed the restaurant Four Seas for nearly 50 years. It’s not like he was looking for a restaurant as ample as the 10,000 square feet he was taking over, but he wanted to preserve this building that he felt was an important piece of Chinatown history and culture. He searched for investors and used his upbringing as a chef, immersion in San Francisco’s Chinatown and travels in China to inform what he wanted with his restaurant.

Related Stories

“Where I arrived with Mister Jiu’s is exactly where I’ve always been: in between. A little of this and a little of that. American and Chinese. Modern and traditional,” Jew writes in his debut cookbook Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown. “It’s a place that celebrates all my influences, standing in the heart of Chinatown, the place where Chinese American food began.”

He’s thought deeply about the canon of Chinese American recipes that grew up in San Francisco and has applied his technique and California’s bounty of produce to create his restaurant that now boasts a Michelin star. And from his new cookbook, he shares his expertise to take a classic fried rice to the next level.

The whole point of fried rice is to showcase the ethereal charred, smoky flavor, aroma, and texture known as wok hei. A wok makes this a lot easier to achieve, but I&rsquove made it happen with a thin cast-iron pan too. Here are the secrets.

  • Use hydrated but not moist rice. This is why leftover rice fries up airy, while fresh rice turns to mush. If necessary, cook up some rice and leave uncovered in the refrigerator 1 day before frying. It should be cold when you start.
  • Get your pan scorching hot. Whatever you&rsquore imagining is probably not hot enough. I set off the fire alarm whenever I cook fried rice at home (and once at a private dinner in a very tall office tower, where Anna Lee and all the office assistants threw open windows and fanned for their lives to prevent everyone in the building from having to evacuate). So turn up the flame and open your windows. Wait for that initial wok hei to hit your nose before adding the oil, then swirl the oil all around and up the sides of the pan. As you cook, unless you have a wok-burner on your gas range or a Chinese hearth stove well-stocked with firewood, you will have to turn up the heat each time you add something new and lower it again before the smoke gets out of control.
  • You have to keep things moving. A wide metal spatula is good for this, and so is a 14-inch or larger wok or pan. If you don&rsquot have a big enough wok for everything to dance around in, cook in batches and combine at the end. If I&rsquom using a cast-iron pan, I have a hand on it at all times so I can keep tossing everything up and around, since a spatula can&rsquot get in the corners fast enough. Line up your ingredients before you turn on the flame.

Cooking fried rice is all about immediacy, but you can begin with a mise of all kinds of leftovers. My mom, for instance, always packed doggy bags of the scraps of roast beef and rib-eye from Saturday nights at Sizzler to make the best fried-rice lunch the next day. This version uses tender marbled cuts of wagyu, chopped broccolini, egg, and a dusting of salty sīn beef heart that takes a few days to cure and may require a special order from the butcher.

Photo: courtesy Ten Speed Press


Chef Brandon Jew Shows How to Make Steak Fried Rice at Home

Brandon Jew

Brandon Jew's Most Recent Stories

In 2016, chef Brandon Jew opened Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco’s Chinatown, occupying the space that had housed the restaurant Four Seas for nearly 50 years. It’s not like he was looking for a restaurant as ample as the 10,000 square feet he was taking over, but he wanted to preserve this building that he felt was an important piece of Chinatown history and culture. He searched for investors and used his upbringing as a chef, immersion in San Francisco’s Chinatown and travels in China to inform what he wanted with his restaurant.

Related Stories

“Where I arrived with Mister Jiu’s is exactly where I’ve always been: in between. A little of this and a little of that. American and Chinese. Modern and traditional,” Jew writes in his debut cookbook Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown. “It’s a place that celebrates all my influences, standing in the heart of Chinatown, the place where Chinese American food began.”

He’s thought deeply about the canon of Chinese American recipes that grew up in San Francisco and has applied his technique and California’s bounty of produce to create his restaurant that now boasts a Michelin star. And from his new cookbook, he shares his expertise to take a classic fried rice to the next level.

The whole point of fried rice is to showcase the ethereal charred, smoky flavor, aroma, and texture known as wok hei. A wok makes this a lot easier to achieve, but I&rsquove made it happen with a thin cast-iron pan too. Here are the secrets.

  • Use hydrated but not moist rice. This is why leftover rice fries up airy, while fresh rice turns to mush. If necessary, cook up some rice and leave uncovered in the refrigerator 1 day before frying. It should be cold when you start.
  • Get your pan scorching hot. Whatever you&rsquore imagining is probably not hot enough. I set off the fire alarm whenever I cook fried rice at home (and once at a private dinner in a very tall office tower, where Anna Lee and all the office assistants threw open windows and fanned for their lives to prevent everyone in the building from having to evacuate). So turn up the flame and open your windows. Wait for that initial wok hei to hit your nose before adding the oil, then swirl the oil all around and up the sides of the pan. As you cook, unless you have a wok-burner on your gas range or a Chinese hearth stove well-stocked with firewood, you will have to turn up the heat each time you add something new and lower it again before the smoke gets out of control.
  • You have to keep things moving. A wide metal spatula is good for this, and so is a 14-inch or larger wok or pan. If you don&rsquot have a big enough wok for everything to dance around in, cook in batches and combine at the end. If I&rsquom using a cast-iron pan, I have a hand on it at all times so I can keep tossing everything up and around, since a spatula can&rsquot get in the corners fast enough. Line up your ingredients before you turn on the flame.

Cooking fried rice is all about immediacy, but you can begin with a mise of all kinds of leftovers. My mom, for instance, always packed doggy bags of the scraps of roast beef and rib-eye from Saturday nights at Sizzler to make the best fried-rice lunch the next day. This version uses tender marbled cuts of wagyu, chopped broccolini, egg, and a dusting of salty sīn beef heart that takes a few days to cure and may require a special order from the butcher.

Photo: courtesy Ten Speed Press


Chef Brandon Jew Shows How to Make Steak Fried Rice at Home

Brandon Jew

Brandon Jew's Most Recent Stories

In 2016, chef Brandon Jew opened Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco’s Chinatown, occupying the space that had housed the restaurant Four Seas for nearly 50 years. It’s not like he was looking for a restaurant as ample as the 10,000 square feet he was taking over, but he wanted to preserve this building that he felt was an important piece of Chinatown history and culture. He searched for investors and used his upbringing as a chef, immersion in San Francisco’s Chinatown and travels in China to inform what he wanted with his restaurant.

Related Stories

“Where I arrived with Mister Jiu’s is exactly where I’ve always been: in between. A little of this and a little of that. American and Chinese. Modern and traditional,” Jew writes in his debut cookbook Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown. “It’s a place that celebrates all my influences, standing in the heart of Chinatown, the place where Chinese American food began.”

He’s thought deeply about the canon of Chinese American recipes that grew up in San Francisco and has applied his technique and California’s bounty of produce to create his restaurant that now boasts a Michelin star. And from his new cookbook, he shares his expertise to take a classic fried rice to the next level.

The whole point of fried rice is to showcase the ethereal charred, smoky flavor, aroma, and texture known as wok hei. A wok makes this a lot easier to achieve, but I&rsquove made it happen with a thin cast-iron pan too. Here are the secrets.

  • Use hydrated but not moist rice. This is why leftover rice fries up airy, while fresh rice turns to mush. If necessary, cook up some rice and leave uncovered in the refrigerator 1 day before frying. It should be cold when you start.
  • Get your pan scorching hot. Whatever you&rsquore imagining is probably not hot enough. I set off the fire alarm whenever I cook fried rice at home (and once at a private dinner in a very tall office tower, where Anna Lee and all the office assistants threw open windows and fanned for their lives to prevent everyone in the building from having to evacuate). So turn up the flame and open your windows. Wait for that initial wok hei to hit your nose before adding the oil, then swirl the oil all around and up the sides of the pan. As you cook, unless you have a wok-burner on your gas range or a Chinese hearth stove well-stocked with firewood, you will have to turn up the heat each time you add something new and lower it again before the smoke gets out of control.
  • You have to keep things moving. A wide metal spatula is good for this, and so is a 14-inch or larger wok or pan. If you don&rsquot have a big enough wok for everything to dance around in, cook in batches and combine at the end. If I&rsquom using a cast-iron pan, I have a hand on it at all times so I can keep tossing everything up and around, since a spatula can&rsquot get in the corners fast enough. Line up your ingredients before you turn on the flame.

Cooking fried rice is all about immediacy, but you can begin with a mise of all kinds of leftovers. My mom, for instance, always packed doggy bags of the scraps of roast beef and rib-eye from Saturday nights at Sizzler to make the best fried-rice lunch the next day. This version uses tender marbled cuts of wagyu, chopped broccolini, egg, and a dusting of salty sīn beef heart that takes a few days to cure and may require a special order from the butcher.

Photo: courtesy Ten Speed Press


Chef Brandon Jew Shows How to Make Steak Fried Rice at Home

Brandon Jew

Brandon Jew's Most Recent Stories

In 2016, chef Brandon Jew opened Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco’s Chinatown, occupying the space that had housed the restaurant Four Seas for nearly 50 years. It’s not like he was looking for a restaurant as ample as the 10,000 square feet he was taking over, but he wanted to preserve this building that he felt was an important piece of Chinatown history and culture. He searched for investors and used his upbringing as a chef, immersion in San Francisco’s Chinatown and travels in China to inform what he wanted with his restaurant.

Related Stories

“Where I arrived with Mister Jiu’s is exactly where I’ve always been: in between. A little of this and a little of that. American and Chinese. Modern and traditional,” Jew writes in his debut cookbook Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown. “It’s a place that celebrates all my influences, standing in the heart of Chinatown, the place where Chinese American food began.”

He’s thought deeply about the canon of Chinese American recipes that grew up in San Francisco and has applied his technique and California’s bounty of produce to create his restaurant that now boasts a Michelin star. And from his new cookbook, he shares his expertise to take a classic fried rice to the next level.

The whole point of fried rice is to showcase the ethereal charred, smoky flavor, aroma, and texture known as wok hei. A wok makes this a lot easier to achieve, but I&rsquove made it happen with a thin cast-iron pan too. Here are the secrets.

  • Use hydrated but not moist rice. This is why leftover rice fries up airy, while fresh rice turns to mush. If necessary, cook up some rice and leave uncovered in the refrigerator 1 day before frying. It should be cold when you start.
  • Get your pan scorching hot. Whatever you&rsquore imagining is probably not hot enough. I set off the fire alarm whenever I cook fried rice at home (and once at a private dinner in a very tall office tower, where Anna Lee and all the office assistants threw open windows and fanned for their lives to prevent everyone in the building from having to evacuate). So turn up the flame and open your windows. Wait for that initial wok hei to hit your nose before adding the oil, then swirl the oil all around and up the sides of the pan. As you cook, unless you have a wok-burner on your gas range or a Chinese hearth stove well-stocked with firewood, you will have to turn up the heat each time you add something new and lower it again before the smoke gets out of control.
  • You have to keep things moving. A wide metal spatula is good for this, and so is a 14-inch or larger wok or pan. If you don&rsquot have a big enough wok for everything to dance around in, cook in batches and combine at the end. If I&rsquom using a cast-iron pan, I have a hand on it at all times so I can keep tossing everything up and around, since a spatula can&rsquot get in the corners fast enough. Line up your ingredients before you turn on the flame.

Cooking fried rice is all about immediacy, but you can begin with a mise of all kinds of leftovers. My mom, for instance, always packed doggy bags of the scraps of roast beef and rib-eye from Saturday nights at Sizzler to make the best fried-rice lunch the next day. This version uses tender marbled cuts of wagyu, chopped broccolini, egg, and a dusting of salty sīn beef heart that takes a few days to cure and may require a special order from the butcher.

Photo: courtesy Ten Speed Press


Chef Brandon Jew Shows How to Make Steak Fried Rice at Home

Brandon Jew

Brandon Jew's Most Recent Stories

In 2016, chef Brandon Jew opened Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco’s Chinatown, occupying the space that had housed the restaurant Four Seas for nearly 50 years. It’s not like he was looking for a restaurant as ample as the 10,000 square feet he was taking over, but he wanted to preserve this building that he felt was an important piece of Chinatown history and culture. He searched for investors and used his upbringing as a chef, immersion in San Francisco’s Chinatown and travels in China to inform what he wanted with his restaurant.

Related Stories

“Where I arrived with Mister Jiu’s is exactly where I’ve always been: in between. A little of this and a little of that. American and Chinese. Modern and traditional,” Jew writes in his debut cookbook Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown. “It’s a place that celebrates all my influences, standing in the heart of Chinatown, the place where Chinese American food began.”

He’s thought deeply about the canon of Chinese American recipes that grew up in San Francisco and has applied his technique and California’s bounty of produce to create his restaurant that now boasts a Michelin star. And from his new cookbook, he shares his expertise to take a classic fried rice to the next level.

The whole point of fried rice is to showcase the ethereal charred, smoky flavor, aroma, and texture known as wok hei. A wok makes this a lot easier to achieve, but I&rsquove made it happen with a thin cast-iron pan too. Here are the secrets.

  • Use hydrated but not moist rice. This is why leftover rice fries up airy, while fresh rice turns to mush. If necessary, cook up some rice and leave uncovered in the refrigerator 1 day before frying. It should be cold when you start.
  • Get your pan scorching hot. Whatever you&rsquore imagining is probably not hot enough. I set off the fire alarm whenever I cook fried rice at home (and once at a private dinner in a very tall office tower, where Anna Lee and all the office assistants threw open windows and fanned for their lives to prevent everyone in the building from having to evacuate). So turn up the flame and open your windows. Wait for that initial wok hei to hit your nose before adding the oil, then swirl the oil all around and up the sides of the pan. As you cook, unless you have a wok-burner on your gas range or a Chinese hearth stove well-stocked with firewood, you will have to turn up the heat each time you add something new and lower it again before the smoke gets out of control.
  • You have to keep things moving. A wide metal spatula is good for this, and so is a 14-inch or larger wok or pan. If you don&rsquot have a big enough wok for everything to dance around in, cook in batches and combine at the end. If I&rsquom using a cast-iron pan, I have a hand on it at all times so I can keep tossing everything up and around, since a spatula can&rsquot get in the corners fast enough. Line up your ingredients before you turn on the flame.

Cooking fried rice is all about immediacy, but you can begin with a mise of all kinds of leftovers. My mom, for instance, always packed doggy bags of the scraps of roast beef and rib-eye from Saturday nights at Sizzler to make the best fried-rice lunch the next day. This version uses tender marbled cuts of wagyu, chopped broccolini, egg, and a dusting of salty sīn beef heart that takes a few days to cure and may require a special order from the butcher.

Photo: courtesy Ten Speed Press


Chef Brandon Jew Shows How to Make Steak Fried Rice at Home

Brandon Jew

Brandon Jew's Most Recent Stories

In 2016, chef Brandon Jew opened Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco’s Chinatown, occupying the space that had housed the restaurant Four Seas for nearly 50 years. It’s not like he was looking for a restaurant as ample as the 10,000 square feet he was taking over, but he wanted to preserve this building that he felt was an important piece of Chinatown history and culture. He searched for investors and used his upbringing as a chef, immersion in San Francisco’s Chinatown and travels in China to inform what he wanted with his restaurant.

Related Stories

“Where I arrived with Mister Jiu’s is exactly where I’ve always been: in between. A little of this and a little of that. American and Chinese. Modern and traditional,” Jew writes in his debut cookbook Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown. “It’s a place that celebrates all my influences, standing in the heart of Chinatown, the place where Chinese American food began.”

He’s thought deeply about the canon of Chinese American recipes that grew up in San Francisco and has applied his technique and California’s bounty of produce to create his restaurant that now boasts a Michelin star. And from his new cookbook, he shares his expertise to take a classic fried rice to the next level.

The whole point of fried rice is to showcase the ethereal charred, smoky flavor, aroma, and texture known as wok hei. A wok makes this a lot easier to achieve, but I&rsquove made it happen with a thin cast-iron pan too. Here are the secrets.

  • Use hydrated but not moist rice. This is why leftover rice fries up airy, while fresh rice turns to mush. If necessary, cook up some rice and leave uncovered in the refrigerator 1 day before frying. It should be cold when you start.
  • Get your pan scorching hot. Whatever you&rsquore imagining is probably not hot enough. I set off the fire alarm whenever I cook fried rice at home (and once at a private dinner in a very tall office tower, where Anna Lee and all the office assistants threw open windows and fanned for their lives to prevent everyone in the building from having to evacuate). So turn up the flame and open your windows. Wait for that initial wok hei to hit your nose before adding the oil, then swirl the oil all around and up the sides of the pan. As you cook, unless you have a wok-burner on your gas range or a Chinese hearth stove well-stocked with firewood, you will have to turn up the heat each time you add something new and lower it again before the smoke gets out of control.
  • You have to keep things moving. A wide metal spatula is good for this, and so is a 14-inch or larger wok or pan. If you don&rsquot have a big enough wok for everything to dance around in, cook in batches and combine at the end. If I&rsquom using a cast-iron pan, I have a hand on it at all times so I can keep tossing everything up and around, since a spatula can&rsquot get in the corners fast enough. Line up your ingredients before you turn on the flame.

Cooking fried rice is all about immediacy, but you can begin with a mise of all kinds of leftovers. My mom, for instance, always packed doggy bags of the scraps of roast beef and rib-eye from Saturday nights at Sizzler to make the best fried-rice lunch the next day. This version uses tender marbled cuts of wagyu, chopped broccolini, egg, and a dusting of salty sīn beef heart that takes a few days to cure and may require a special order from the butcher.

Photo: courtesy Ten Speed Press


Chef Brandon Jew Shows How to Make Steak Fried Rice at Home

Brandon Jew

Brandon Jew's Most Recent Stories

In 2016, chef Brandon Jew opened Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco’s Chinatown, occupying the space that had housed the restaurant Four Seas for nearly 50 years. It’s not like he was looking for a restaurant as ample as the 10,000 square feet he was taking over, but he wanted to preserve this building that he felt was an important piece of Chinatown history and culture. He searched for investors and used his upbringing as a chef, immersion in San Francisco’s Chinatown and travels in China to inform what he wanted with his restaurant.

Related Stories

“Where I arrived with Mister Jiu’s is exactly where I’ve always been: in between. A little of this and a little of that. American and Chinese. Modern and traditional,” Jew writes in his debut cookbook Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown. “It’s a place that celebrates all my influences, standing in the heart of Chinatown, the place where Chinese American food began.”

He’s thought deeply about the canon of Chinese American recipes that grew up in San Francisco and has applied his technique and California’s bounty of produce to create his restaurant that now boasts a Michelin star. And from his new cookbook, he shares his expertise to take a classic fried rice to the next level.

The whole point of fried rice is to showcase the ethereal charred, smoky flavor, aroma, and texture known as wok hei. A wok makes this a lot easier to achieve, but I&rsquove made it happen with a thin cast-iron pan too. Here are the secrets.

  • Use hydrated but not moist rice. This is why leftover rice fries up airy, while fresh rice turns to mush. If necessary, cook up some rice and leave uncovered in the refrigerator 1 day before frying. It should be cold when you start.
  • Get your pan scorching hot. Whatever you&rsquore imagining is probably not hot enough. I set off the fire alarm whenever I cook fried rice at home (and once at a private dinner in a very tall office tower, where Anna Lee and all the office assistants threw open windows and fanned for their lives to prevent everyone in the building from having to evacuate). So turn up the flame and open your windows. Wait for that initial wok hei to hit your nose before adding the oil, then swirl the oil all around and up the sides of the pan. As you cook, unless you have a wok-burner on your gas range or a Chinese hearth stove well-stocked with firewood, you will have to turn up the heat each time you add something new and lower it again before the smoke gets out of control.
  • You have to keep things moving. A wide metal spatula is good for this, and so is a 14-inch or larger wok or pan. If you don&rsquot have a big enough wok for everything to dance around in, cook in batches and combine at the end. If I&rsquom using a cast-iron pan, I have a hand on it at all times so I can keep tossing everything up and around, since a spatula can&rsquot get in the corners fast enough. Line up your ingredients before you turn on the flame.

Cooking fried rice is all about immediacy, but you can begin with a mise of all kinds of leftovers. My mom, for instance, always packed doggy bags of the scraps of roast beef and rib-eye from Saturday nights at Sizzler to make the best fried-rice lunch the next day. This version uses tender marbled cuts of wagyu, chopped broccolini, egg, and a dusting of salty sīn beef heart that takes a few days to cure and may require a special order from the butcher.

Photo: courtesy Ten Speed Press


Chef Brandon Jew Shows How to Make Steak Fried Rice at Home

Brandon Jew

Brandon Jew's Most Recent Stories

In 2016, chef Brandon Jew opened Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco’s Chinatown, occupying the space that had housed the restaurant Four Seas for nearly 50 years. It’s not like he was looking for a restaurant as ample as the 10,000 square feet he was taking over, but he wanted to preserve this building that he felt was an important piece of Chinatown history and culture. He searched for investors and used his upbringing as a chef, immersion in San Francisco’s Chinatown and travels in China to inform what he wanted with his restaurant.

Related Stories

“Where I arrived with Mister Jiu’s is exactly where I’ve always been: in between. A little of this and a little of that. American and Chinese. Modern and traditional,” Jew writes in his debut cookbook Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown. “It’s a place that celebrates all my influences, standing in the heart of Chinatown, the place where Chinese American food began.”

He’s thought deeply about the canon of Chinese American recipes that grew up in San Francisco and has applied his technique and California’s bounty of produce to create his restaurant that now boasts a Michelin star. And from his new cookbook, he shares his expertise to take a classic fried rice to the next level.

The whole point of fried rice is to showcase the ethereal charred, smoky flavor, aroma, and texture known as wok hei. A wok makes this a lot easier to achieve, but I&rsquove made it happen with a thin cast-iron pan too. Here are the secrets.

  • Use hydrated but not moist rice. This is why leftover rice fries up airy, while fresh rice turns to mush. If necessary, cook up some rice and leave uncovered in the refrigerator 1 day before frying. It should be cold when you start.
  • Get your pan scorching hot. Whatever you&rsquore imagining is probably not hot enough. I set off the fire alarm whenever I cook fried rice at home (and once at a private dinner in a very tall office tower, where Anna Lee and all the office assistants threw open windows and fanned for their lives to prevent everyone in the building from having to evacuate). So turn up the flame and open your windows. Wait for that initial wok hei to hit your nose before adding the oil, then swirl the oil all around and up the sides of the pan. As you cook, unless you have a wok-burner on your gas range or a Chinese hearth stove well-stocked with firewood, you will have to turn up the heat each time you add something new and lower it again before the smoke gets out of control.
  • You have to keep things moving. A wide metal spatula is good for this, and so is a 14-inch or larger wok or pan. If you don&rsquot have a big enough wok for everything to dance around in, cook in batches and combine at the end. If I&rsquom using a cast-iron pan, I have a hand on it at all times so I can keep tossing everything up and around, since a spatula can&rsquot get in the corners fast enough. Line up your ingredients before you turn on the flame.

Cooking fried rice is all about immediacy, but you can begin with a mise of all kinds of leftovers. My mom, for instance, always packed doggy bags of the scraps of roast beef and rib-eye from Saturday nights at Sizzler to make the best fried-rice lunch the next day. This version uses tender marbled cuts of wagyu, chopped broccolini, egg, and a dusting of salty sīn beef heart that takes a few days to cure and may require a special order from the butcher.

Photo: courtesy Ten Speed Press


Chef Brandon Jew Shows How to Make Steak Fried Rice at Home

Brandon Jew

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In 2016, chef Brandon Jew opened Mister Jiu’s in San Francisco’s Chinatown, occupying the space that had housed the restaurant Four Seas for nearly 50 years. It’s not like he was looking for a restaurant as ample as the 10,000 square feet he was taking over, but he wanted to preserve this building that he felt was an important piece of Chinatown history and culture. He searched for investors and used his upbringing as a chef, immersion in San Francisco’s Chinatown and travels in China to inform what he wanted with his restaurant.

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“Where I arrived with Mister Jiu’s is exactly where I’ve always been: in between. A little of this and a little of that. American and Chinese. Modern and traditional,” Jew writes in his debut cookbook Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown. “It’s a place that celebrates all my influences, standing in the heart of Chinatown, the place where Chinese American food began.”

He’s thought deeply about the canon of Chinese American recipes that grew up in San Francisco and has applied his technique and California’s bounty of produce to create his restaurant that now boasts a Michelin star. And from his new cookbook, he shares his expertise to take a classic fried rice to the next level.

The whole point of fried rice is to showcase the ethereal charred, smoky flavor, aroma, and texture known as wok hei. A wok makes this a lot easier to achieve, but I&rsquove made it happen with a thin cast-iron pan too. Here are the secrets.

  • Use hydrated but not moist rice. This is why leftover rice fries up airy, while fresh rice turns to mush. If necessary, cook up some rice and leave uncovered in the refrigerator 1 day before frying. It should be cold when you start.
  • Get your pan scorching hot. Whatever you&rsquore imagining is probably not hot enough. I set off the fire alarm whenever I cook fried rice at home (and once at a private dinner in a very tall office tower, where Anna Lee and all the office assistants threw open windows and fanned for their lives to prevent everyone in the building from having to evacuate). So turn up the flame and open your windows. Wait for that initial wok hei to hit your nose before adding the oil, then swirl the oil all around and up the sides of the pan. As you cook, unless you have a wok-burner on your gas range or a Chinese hearth stove well-stocked with firewood, you will have to turn up the heat each time you add something new and lower it again before the smoke gets out of control.
  • You have to keep things moving. A wide metal spatula is good for this, and so is a 14-inch or larger wok or pan. If you don&rsquot have a big enough wok for everything to dance around in, cook in batches and combine at the end. If I&rsquom using a cast-iron pan, I have a hand on it at all times so I can keep tossing everything up and around, since a spatula can&rsquot get in the corners fast enough. Line up your ingredients before you turn on the flame.

Cooking fried rice is all about immediacy, but you can begin with a mise of all kinds of leftovers. My mom, for instance, always packed doggy bags of the scraps of roast beef and rib-eye from Saturday nights at Sizzler to make the best fried-rice lunch the next day. This version uses tender marbled cuts of wagyu, chopped broccolini, egg, and a dusting of salty sīn beef heart that takes a few days to cure and may require a special order from the butcher.

Photo: courtesy Ten Speed Press